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People & Wildlife Thriving Together

How community-led conservation can save wildlife | Moreangels Mbizah
Human-Wildlife Conflict with
Lisa Chitura | The Daily Dose

About Us

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Founded in 2019, Wildlife Conservation Action (WCA) promotes human-wildlife coexistence in Zimbabwe's critical wildlife areas. Integrating indigenous knowledge and scientific expertise, we partner closely with communities to craft effective solutions for human-wildlife conflict, benefitting both livelihoods and wildlife, especially key species such as lions and elephants. We address pressing threats faced by these wildlife species due to habitat loss and conflict with humans.

 

Using a non-lethal, culturally sensitive approach, we conduct research to understand wildlife behaviour and trends, which guides our interventions. This involves raising awareness among the community and advising farmers on fortifying livestock enclosures, monitoring wildlife movements to protect livestock and crop fields, and collaborating with broader conservation and community associations for greater impact.

 

We also raise awareness of wildlife and conservation to Zimbabwe’s younger generations, fostering love and understanding of their natural heritage.

What We Do

Human-Wildlife Coexistence Program

Our human-wildlife co-existence projects are focused on reducing costs and increasing benefits. We are working with local communities in reducing and preventing incidence of conflict and increasing the benefits communities get from living alongside wildlife and improving community livelihoods.

Environmental Education and Awareness Program

We strive to instill knowledge and a sense of appreciation for the environment, nature and wildlife among the school children, future conservation leaders, community members and the general public.

Sustainable Livelihoods
Program

The focus is to empower local communities with the knowledge and resources needed to develop sustainable and eco-friendly livelihoods. By fostering a sense of sufficiency, we aim to alleviate poverty, reduce pressure on natural resources and contribute to overall community well-being.

Research and Conservation Leadership

Our conservation work is driven by comprehensive research that identifies and addresses the most pressing threats facing wildlife species and entire ecosystems. By understanding the specific challenges

through detailed studies, we implement targeted actions that mitigate these threats

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Where We Work

Our Projects

Nyaminyami Human- wildlife
Coexistence Project

In human dominated landscapes co-existence between humans and wildlife can only be achieved when loss of human life and livelihoods (crops and livestock) to wildlife is reduced. The project’s vision is to restore wildlife populations that benefit communities living in the Sebungwe landscape of north western Zimbabwe.

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Mbire Human-wildlife
Coexistence Project

The project's objective is to improve HWC mitigation and monitoring in Mbire District hotspot areas. It is specifically addressing human-carnivore mitigation through provision of predator proof cattle bomas and reinforcement of existing conventional livestock kraals.

Guardians Of The Wild (GOTW)

Guardians of the Wild (GOTW) is our conservation education program, which is aimed at educating children in rural and urban schools about the importance of conservation and sustainable development. This is achieved through the establishment of conservation clubs in the schools, all under the name GUARDIANS OF THE WILD.

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Get Involved

There are several ways you can support our work of conserving wildlife & empowering communities

Our Impact

100

Mobile Bomas constructed to prevent the predation of livestock by wildlife, with no predator attacks recorded inside since 2021.

1888

Students reached via environmental education and awareness enabling us to inspire young minds towards a conservative future.

81

Lion lights in use benefitting 20 households, ensuring safety and peace by deterring predators.

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